South Asia: Our work in 2011
02 July 2012

Guzare is a Taliban area in Herat. Parents asked for more english classes for their daughters and this was the result. Photo by Peter Balleis/JRS Interternational
In Afghanistan, girls educated other girls thanks to "Each one teach some," innovative. JRS invited each of the 50 students to tutor three to five other girls in their neighbourhood.
New Delhi, 7 July 2012 – In a year marked with conflict in some places and refugees returning home in others, JRS work expanded to meet the needs in a situation that is always changing.

In Afghanistan, girls educated other girls thanks to "Each one teach some," an innovative module of the JRS English Access programme in Herat. In 2011, JRS invited each of the 50 students to tutor three to five other girls in their neighbourhood, once or twice a week, gratis. The girls proved enthusiastic and highly motivated, teaching over 300 girls. They grew in confidence, became more fluent in English, and were eager to make a difference in their community.

“I feel wonderful, not only because I have so many students, but because they are so intelligent and hardworking. They are regular and come on time for class. I always pray to Allah to be a good teacher and to be able to serve others. I would like my students to do well and teach others, in turn,” said Sharbat, a student teacher in Afghanistan.
 
Inequity in access to education and resources makes households headed by women especially vulnerable to poverty in Afghanistan. In 2011 JRS joined hands with a local NGO to establish 10 self-help groups for women in Shaydei, a township near Herat city that is home to 300 returnee families from Iran and Pakistan. The project gave 200 women the opportunity to earn a living. The groups held regular meetings and supported their members by providing loans and sharing difficulties, using the problem-solving skills acquired during training.

“I am leader of the Shaqayeq group. We received training for three months from a Herat University student who taught us very professionally. We come together to embroider household linen and clothes, using beautiful traditional patterns. We plan to start a weekly bazaar in our township, to put the products of our groups on sale. With our training and group activities, we have grown in confidence and unity," said Fatima.

“I was repeatedly abused by a camp inmate and tried to commit suicide twice. JRS staff used to give talks regularly about gender-based violence. Taking courage, I shared my suffering with them and got help. I joined a JRS life-skills programme and this gave me new life. The input on stress management and fraternal accompaniment lifted my hopes and gave me confidence to face life," said Nirochini.





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